Health: HLTH 1047: First Peoples' Health

Assessments

This workshop will get you started finding resources and writing Assessments 1 and 2. You should use a range of quality sources to support the argument that you are presenting in your essay. 

Read all information related to your assessment to understand what your lecturers and tutors are looking for when they are marking your assessments!!

This will help you gain an overall understanding of the assessment and will help you plan the structure and the content of your assignment based on assessment marking criteria.

This workshop consists of 6 sections:

  1. Understanding the question
  2. Developing your search strategy
  3. Searching for information
  4. Evaluating and selecting resources
  5. Writing your essay
  6. Referencing reminder
Follow the these sections in order and attempt the tasks in each section to get maximum benefit from this assignment help!

Assessment 1: Essay – Context of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ health

Due date/time: 5pm, Friday 18 August 2017 (end of Week 4)

Task directions:

Consider and discuss the following statement:

The past and current inequalities in physical and mental health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians is associated with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s experiences of interpersonal and institutional racism.

In your response you are to take into account the relevant epidemiological and demographic information and the key cultural and socio-economic factors that underpin the health inequalities referred to in the statement. You also are required to explain how you might work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals and communities to promote social, emotional and physical well-being.

The starting point for your essay should be the course work presented in Topics 1, 2 and the first part of Topic 3, as well as the other resources provided in the Library's Nursing subject guide.

For more information please check the Assessments section in the course's Learnonline site.

Assessment 2: Group Project: Portfolio and Individual Poster (Grade worth – 60%)

Please note that the word equivalent means that all the work you do to complete this assignment is taken into account, inclusive of participation in class and online discussion forums, even if the total word count in the poster and individual reflection may be less than 2,500 actual words.

  • Part A: Learning Contract (Group) (15%)
  • Part B: Individual Poster (70%)
  • Part C: Evaluation of the Group Portfolio (15%)

Task instructions:

You are on a primary health care placement in a metropolitan Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Service that is implementing the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Care Plan 2012-2023 (Australian Government 2013, p. 27). The Health Care Plan identified seven (7) risk factors contributing to the health gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the non-indigenous Australian population. These are: tobacco, obesity, physical inactivity, high blood cholesterol, alcohol, high blood pressure and low fruit and vegetable intake. The health service is planning health care strategies/activities to address the risk factors.

The individual and group components of this assessment relate to ONE of the seven (7) risk factors and must address the following issues:

  1. Background information including epidemiology about the risk factor
  2. Contemporary health care strategies that addresses the risk factor including the barriers and enablers for health promotion
  3. Strategies to ensure culturally safe care practices including effective cross-cultural communication relevant to the community setting
  4. Changing the nature of the healthcare workforce to make it more culturally appropriate and accessible

Your tutor will allocate each student to a group and then allocate each group one of the seven (7) risk factors from the Health Care Plan as the focus of the assessment.

For more information please check the Assessments section in the course's Learnonline site.

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1. Understanding the question

In order to understand what is being asked in your assignment question, consider the following factors:

  1. Task words - these words tell you what you need to do in your assignment (e.g. describe, identify, discuss, explain). For example: What does the word 'describe' mean? It means you need to give a detailed account in detail.
  2. Find the content words in the task. These words indicate the 'what' - the content area that you will be thinking about. You can identify the content words in a task by taking the task word and adding the question “What?”
  3. Find the limits. For example:
    • Limits on resources: Do you have to use academic, scholarly resources? You need to use credible references in your assessment. What are credible references? Academic peer reviewed/refereed articles have been evaluated and recommended for publication by one or more experts in the field. These articles are credible, and you need to use these in your assignments.
    • Time limit: Check your due date. How much time do you have to research, think, plan and write the assignment?
    • Word count limit: Is there a word limit? How much detail and analysis will you be able to include in your paper or presentation?
    • Percentage limit:  Worth 40% of final grade. How much time and energy should you put into the assignment?
Your task: Make a 'guesstimate plan' of how much research you need to do, considering factors 1, 2 and 3 (above).

2. Developing your search strategy

Complex assessment questions need to be broken down into subtopics.

To search effectively in the Library Catalogue, databases, and the internet, first break the question down into manageable subtopics. This video shows you how to this.

Your task: Now apply what you learnt from the video into your assignment and break it into individual components

Follow the steps in the next 3 tabs for each subtopic that you identified.

Identify key concepts in each subtopic that you identified from your assessment question.

To develop an effective search strategy you need to break each subtopic into concepts (or parts) and choose the important keywords (or topic words) from each concept.

Watch this video to learn how to break the each subtopic into concepts.

Lets apply what we learnt from the video to this example assignment subtopic: How has colonisation affected the health of Maori people?

  Concept 1 Concept 2 Concept 3
From the assignment Maori colonisation health
Your task: Identify key concepts for each subtopic in your assessment question

Now you need to identify synonyms for the key concepts that you identified

The next step in the search process is to see whether there are alternative words or spellings for each concept that you identified.

Watch this video to learn how to do this:

Lets apply what we learnt from the video to this example assignment subtopic: How has colonisation affected the health of Maori people?

  Concept 1 Concept 2 Concept 3
From the assignment Maori colonisation health
Synonyms indigenous colonisation, settlement, migration, invasion wellbeing, wellness

Your task: Now see whether you can identify synonyms for the key concepts that you selected

Sources of alternate terms:

  • Dictionaries, encyclopaedias, handbooks (online and print)
  • Thesaurus feature in Microsoft Word
  • Databases
  • Articles/books that you have already found on the topic

Here is how you combine the search terms that you identified before you start searching in databases.

First watch this video to learn how to connect and combine search terms

Lets apply what we learnt from the video to this example assignment subtopic: How has colonisation affected the health of Maori people?

Maori OR indigenous

AND

colonisation OR colonization OR settlement OR migration OR invasion

AND

health OR wellbeing OR wellness

Your task: Develop a search strategy by combining the concepts and keywords that you identified
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3. Searching for Information

Fast facts about Library databases:

  • databases can have a general or subject-specific focus
  • they may index the details about journal articles, reports and news stories
  • many databases provide the full text of the articles

Useful databases to search

Also have a look at the Social Work and Human Services guide.

Watch the following video to help you plan your search strategy and search for information.

Here’s an example of a search in Academic Search Premier:

Refining the results

A useful option at the results list is to Refine Results to show only Scholarly (Peer Reviewed) Journals), and to limit to a Publication Date range, eg 2012–2017.

Finding full text

  • Where possible, links to the full text will appear as PDF attachments.
  • When there is no immediate access to the PDF, use the Find it link. This will automatically search the Library Catalogue for your reference, and may provide some access options (e.g. 'Read this article' or 'Browse this journal').
  • For more information, read the Find a full text article using Find it guide.
Your task: Use the key concepts, synonyms and the search plan that you developed to search in the databases listed above.

Here are some databases that you can search in for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people:

The Library Catalogue can be a useful starting point in locating information. It is like a search engine which searches across the Library’s collection of print and electronic books, DVDs, journals and theses, together with journal and newspaper articles from numerous databases.

Use the Library Catalogue:

  • to find a book or ebook by its title
  • to find a journal article by its title, or use a combination of article title and author
  • to find information in books, journals and other materials on a topic

Use the down arrow next to the search box to select All Fields, Title, Author, Subject or Journal Title. All Fields is a keyword search, and is the default search option.

Our example topic:

How has colonisation affected the health of Maori people?

To do a search on this topic, try using:

  • double quotes for phrases
  • truncation (*) to find the plural and other forms of a word

At the results list you can:

  • Limit to articles from Peer Reviewed publications 
  • Limit by Date e.g. 2012 to 2017
  • Limit by Subject. This will make sure that the article has a major focus on your subject (e.g. Maori health)

See the full text for many items by selecting the title, then look for the Online link. There may be several options to choose from. This is because we may have access through more than one publisher or database.

The internet can be a useful source of information for this assessment. Use the key concepts and synonyms that you identified in step 2 (above) to search.

Useful internet sources include:

Tips when searching in Google Scholar

Use Google Scholar to find more scholarly material than is usually found in search engines  for example from educational and government web sites. An advantage of Google Scholar is that it provides access to the full text of many scholarly/academic articles if you connect to it via the link above (i.e. via the Library website).

In Assignment 2 you are asked to focus on one of the seven (7) risk factors to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and well being that require action:

  • Tobacco use
  • Reduce obesity
  • Increase Physical activity
  • Reduction of blood cholesterol
  • Alcohol use
  • Action on high blood pressure
  • Increase intake of fruit and vegetable

These risk factors are listed in the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023 (Australian Government 2013, pp. 27–28)

The table below provides some example individual- and environmental-focused health promotion strategies or activities that focus on these risk factors. You might find these resources helpful as you work with your group on Assignment 2.

Examples of effective health interventions and health promotion activities & programs developed with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and Oxfam Australia, 2007, Close the Gap: Solutions to the Indigenous Health Crisis Facing Australia. There is a list Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health interventions and health promotion success stories listed on pages 14–16.

Australian Human Rights Commission 2017, Close the Gap: Indigenous Health Campaign. There are 8 documents listed that report on the progress of the Close the Gap campaign. Most of them include a list of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health success stories including successful interventions and health promotion programs and activities.

Risk factors identified in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan (2013)

Resources to support the health promotion activities (includes examples of health promotion programs)

Obesity

Low fruit and vegetable intake

Nutrition

Australian Government 2012, Healthy Lifestyle Programs for Physical Activity and Nutrition.

Australian Government 2016, Nutrition and Healthy Eating.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet 2015, Health Promotion Resources. Includes links to health promotional resources related to overweight and obesity risk factors.

Brimblecombe & O'Dea 2009, 'The role of energy cost in food choices for an Aboriginal population in northern Australia', Medical Journal of Australia.

Browne, Laurence, & Thorpe 2009, Acting on Food Insecurity in Urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities, Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Colles, Maypilama & Brimblecombe 2014, 'Food, food choice and nutrition promotion in a remote Australian Aboriginal community', Australian Journal of Primary Health.

Gracey et al. 2006, 'An Aboriginal-driven program to prevent, control and manage nutrition-related "lifestyle" diseases including diabetes', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Gracey 2000, ‘Historical, cultural, political, and social influences on dietary patterns and nutrition in Australian Aboriginal children’, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services 2016, How Much Sugar is in Your Drink?.

Lee et al. 2009, 'Improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander nutrition and health', Medical Journal of Australia.

Menzies School of Health Research 2013, Working together – Indigenous Nutrition.

Queensland Health 2008, A Healthy Start in Life: A Nutrition Manual for Health Professionals. Includes helpful resources, including one for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nutrition (section 1.9).

Western Australian Government 2012, Go for 2&5 Fruit and Vegetable Campaign.

World Health Organization 2017, Nutrition. General information about nutrition.

Physical activity

 

Australian Government 2013, Supporting Healthy Communities Through Sports and Recreation Programs.

Australian Government 2012, Healthy Lifestyle Programs for Physical Activity and Nutrition.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet 2015, Health Promotion Resources. Includes links to health promotional resources related to physical activity.

Red Dust Role Models 2017, Healthy Living Program.

Reilly et al. 2013, 'What makes us different? The role of Rumbalara Football and Netball Club in promoting Indigenous wellbeing', Australian Community Psychologist.

Thorpe, Anders & Rowley 2014, 'The community network: an Aboriginal community football club bringing people together', Australian Journal of Primary Health.

Queensland Health 2008, A Healthy Start in Life: A Nutrition Manual for Health Professionals. Includes helpful resources, including general information about physical activity (section 1.7).

World Health Organization 2017, Physical Activity. General information about this risk factor.

Tobacco

 

Australian Government 2017, Quit Now - Don’t Make Smokes Your Story. Examples of a government approach to stopping smoking for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Includes some good videos.

Australian Government 2017, Indigenous Anti-Smoking Campaign: Break the Chain.

Australian Government 2011, Anti-Tobacco Programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet 2015, Health Promotion Resources - Tobacco. Includes links to health promotional resources related to this risk factor.

Briggs, Lindorff & Ivers 2003, 'Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians and Tobacco', Tobacco Control.

Campbell, MA, Finlay, S, Lucas, K, Neal, N & Williams, R 2014, 'Kick the habit: a social marketing campaign by Aboriginal communities in NSW', Australian Journal of Primary Health, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 327-333

Creative Spirits 2016, Aboriginal smoking: a serious health problem, viewed 29th May 2017, https://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/health/aboriginal-smoking-a-serious-health-problem#axzz4iRbqY0jt

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services 2016, Nuff of a Puff Poster, viewed 29th May 2017, http://103.18.109.102/~kamscorg/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/How-Much-Sugar-is-in-your-drink-A3-Poster.pdf

NSW Health 2010, The NSW SmokeCheck Aboriginal Tobacco Prevention Project 2007 – 2008, viewed 20th May 2017, www.health.nsw.gov.au/tobacco/Publications/smokecheck-report.pdf

WHO 2017, Tobacco, viewed 12th June 2017, http://www.who.int/topics/tobacco/en/

High blood pressure

High blood cholesterol

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet 2017, Cardiovascular health (HeartInfoNet), viewed 13th July 2017, http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/chronic-conditions/cvd (this is an important resource with many relevant links for this risk factor)

Brown, A, Keech, W, McBride, K, Kelly, J, Stewart, S, & Dowling, A 2016, SA Aboriginal Heart and Stroke Plan 2017-2021, SAHMRI, Adelaide, viewed 12th June 2017, https://www.sahmriresearch.org/user_assets/4e12028fe20d2d4184310fdb2f1df0610adf0971/sa_aboriginal_heart_and_stroke_plan_2017-2021_final.pdf (browse through to find relevant information. Read the Executive Summary; the epidemiology on the risk factors and the sections on Guiding principles of the Plan & Primary Preventative care)

Burgess, CP, Johnston, FH, Berry, HL, Mcdonnell, J, Yibarbuk, D, Gunabarra, C, et al 2009, 'Healthy country, healthy people: the relationship between Indigenous health status and "caring for country"', The Medical journal of Australia, vol. 190, no. 10, pp. 567.

Huffman, MD & Galloway, JM 2010, 'Cardiovascular Health in Indigenous Communities: Successful Programs', Heart, Lung and Circulation, vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 351-360.

Tibby, D, Corpus, R & Walters, DL 2010, 'Establishment of an Innovative Specialist Cardiac Indigenous Outreach Service in Rural and Remote Queensland', Heart, Lung and Circulation, vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 361-366.

World Health Organization 2017, Cardiovascular disease, viewed 12th June 2017, http://www.who.int/topics/cardiovascular_diseases/en/

Alcohol

Australian Government 2006, National Alcohol Strategy, Department of Health, viewed 10th June 2017, http://webarchive.nla.gov.au/gov/20140801013918/http://www.alcohol.gov.au/internet/alcohol/publishing.nsf/Content/nas-06-09 (Read the Executive Summary on pp. 2-3) This strategy is under review and a new Strategy is due for publication in late 2017)

Australian Government 2015, Alcohol, Department of Health, viewed 10th June 2017, http://www.alcohol.gov.au/

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet 2017, Australian Indigenous Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre, viewed 23rd June 2017, http://www.aodknowledgecentre.net.au/aodkc/alcohol/publications/specific-topics/prevention-and-treatment (This site has a wide range of information including health promotion resources covering publications from 2011-2017)

Brady, M 2007, 'Equality and difference: persisting historical themes in health and alcohol policies affecting Indigenous Australians', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, vol. 61, no. 9, pp. 759.

Brown, A & Brown, N 2007, 'The Northern Territory intervention: voices from the centre of the fringe', Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 187, no. 11/12, pp. 621-3.

Dudgeon P, Walker R, Scrine C et al. 2014, Effective strategies to strengthen the mental health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, Issues paper no. 12, Closing the Gap Clearinghouse, Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare & Melbourne, viewed 12th June 2017, http://www.aihw.gov.au/uploadedFiles/ClosingTheGap/Content/Our_publications/2014/ctgc_ip12.pdf.

Fitts, MS Gavan R Palk, GR 2015, Development of a drink driving program for regional and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, National Drug Law Research Agency (NDLRA), Monograph no. 55, pp. 1-5 (Executive Summary), viewed 12th June 2017, http://www.ndlerf.gov.au/publications/monographs/monograph-55

Loxley, W, Gray, D, Wilkinson, C, Chikritzhs, T, Midford, R & Moore, D 2005, 'Alcohol policy and harm reduction in Australia', Drug and Alcohol Review, 2005, Vol.24(6), p.559-568, vol. 24, no. 6, pp. 559-568.

Munro, A, Allan, J, Shakeshaft, A & Snijder, M 2017, 'Riding the rural radio wave: The impact of a community-led drug and alcohol radio advertising campaign in a remote Australian Aboriginal community', Australian Journal of Rural Health, in press: doi: 10.1111/ajr.12345

Wilkes, E 2015, 'Aboriginal autonomy and the reduction of alcohol‐related harm', Drug and Alcohol Review, vol. 34, no. 5, pp. 469-470.

World Health Organization 2017, Alcohol, viewed 13th June 2017, http://www.who.int/topics/alcohol_drinking/en/

 

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4. Evaluating and selecting resources

You need to use credible references for assessment 1&2. Credible references are articles from Peer reviewed journals that are of high quality and can be used to support arguments that you are presenting. Articles in peer reviewed journals must go through an evaluation process with experts in the field before being published. The term refereed is also used.

The terms scholarly and academic are also sometimes used to indicate quality journals.

Watch the Scholarly sources explained video  - it takes under 3 minutes and features an academic from the School of Health Sciences.

Watch the below video Peer Review in 3 minutes by NCSU Libraries. Published under a Creative Commons 3.0 BY-NC-SA US license.

Your task: Apply what you learnt from the video to ensure that references that you selected are academic/peer reviewed.

It is important that you evaluate a web site to ensure that the information is reliable. Consider:

  • Authority
    • who wrote it?
    • what are their qualifications/credentials?
    • is it from an authoritative source?
  • Timeliness
    • when was the information published?
    • is it updated regularly?
  • Bias
    • is it fact, opinion or propaganda?
  • Relevance
    • is the information relevant to the assignment topic?
    • does the information actually cover your topic?
Your task: Apply what you learnt from the video to ensure that references that you selected are reliable
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5. Writing your essay/report/poster

Use the information gathered and your knowledge of the assessment to plan the structure and content of the report.

Introduction (250 words)

    • Provide general background to the topic
    • Outline the focus and structure of your essay

Discussion (1500 words)

    • Divide into one topic/area of analysis per paragraph.

                    Example:

  • Health disparities and social determinants of health
  • History, colonisation and impacts of government policy
  • Strengths based health promotion

Conclusion (250 words)

    • Summarise the main points discussed throughout your essay

       Reference list (not counted in word limit)

  • 10-15 credible references to support your essay arguments

Header and footer: Your assignment should include your Student ID and Course ID at top and page numbers at the bottom.

NOTE:  Some students like to start writing their essays by drafting an introduction first to get the structure clear.  Others like to draft the Body paragraphs to get a clearer understanding of their content and then write the introduction and conclusion.  Do what suits you best!

Have a look at the Academic Writing Requirements for more help.

More tips to complete your assignments are available on Study help: Online resources hub page.

Part A: Learning Contract (Group assessment) (250 word equivalent):

The assessment will be conducted on the basis of a Learning Contract to be finalised between the group members and their tutor at the commencement of the course. The template for the Learning Contract must be downloaded from Assessment section of the course site in the first week of the course.

Purpose of the Learning Contract: The learning contract aims to facilitate students in each group to work effectively as a team and with their tutor, to meet the Course Learning Objectives being assessed such that each student completes their individual poster in time for completion of the Group Portfolio (Part C).

  • Students will be randomly allocated to a group by their tutor in the first week of the course. You cannot change to another group once you are allocated.
  • Each group will then be allocated one (1) of the seven (7) risk factors included in the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013 – 2023 (Australian Government 2013, p. 27)
  • Each group will work together to complete the Learning Contract Template within the first two (2) weeks of the course. As part of this process the group will negotiate which one of the four (4) components each student will focus on when completing their individual poster. More details are provided in the Learning Contract Template.
  • Each group will work together to complete two (2) progress reports related to the Learning Contract. Each student will submit their individual copy of the completed Progress Reports to Learnonline as part of their assessment. The templates for these reports must be downloaded from the Course Learnonline web site.

Part B: Poster (Individual assessment) (1500 word equivalent):

Each student must work alone to produce an individual poster that addresses one (1) of the following four (4) components listed below that address the risk factor allocated. The information in the poster must be supported by credible literature.

The components are:

  1. Background information including epidemiology about the risk factor
  2. Contemporary health care strategies that addresses the risk factor including the barriers and enablers for health promotion
  3. Strategies to ensure culturally safe care practices including effective cross-cultural communication relevant to the community setting
  4. Changing the nature of the healthcare workforce to make it more culturally appropriate and accessible.

The poster must include a minimum ten (10) references that are formatted as per UniSA Harvard Referencing Guide at the bottom of your poster.

Have a look at this Melbourne University guide to learn how to design the poster

Each of the individual posters will be reviewed by the group as part of Part C of the assessment (i.e. the group portfolio).

As an example, an individual student within a group might be responsible to develop their poster focussing on the Background/epidemiology component of the risk factor allocated (e.g. Tobacco).

Please submit your poster to Learnonline as a Power Point Slide file (not PDF). Please note that PDF files will not be marked.

Part C: Group Portfolio (750 word equivalent)

The group is required to review the individual posters produced within the group to complete this part of the assessment task. This represents a portfolio of posters that together demonstrate how the group has addressed all aspects of the activities related to the risk factor from the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013 – 2023.

  • Members of the group are required to write a concluding summary based on the work of each of the individual posters to demonstrate what the group has learnt about the risk factor (e.g. tobacco). In your response, include a sentence that describes the extent to which the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013 – 2023 has been implemented. A starting point would be to read the Close the Gap, Progress and Priorities report 2017 (Australian Human Rights Commission, 2017). 
  • The group summary should also explain how the knowledge gained from this course could influence future practice when working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals, families or communities.
  • The group summary must include minimum ten (10) references that are formatted as per UniSA Harvard Referencing Guide.

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6. Referencing reminders

Academic writing is based on wide reading of academic sources and you MUST acknowledge the writings and ideas of other people by using a referencing system.

The referencing in your assignment shows two things:

§  the range of ideas and approaches to a topic that you have found and thought about

§  your acknowledgement of where these ideas came from.

Three main rules

 Each reference must appear in two places i.e. the Harvard referencing system is a TWO part system:

 1. shown in the text of your assignment each time it is used (the in-text reference)

 2. listed once in the reference list at the end of the assignment. This listing has full details so that your reader can find the reference. 

 3. A reference must be included every time you use someone else’s ideas or information. When you:

  • paraphrase (express someone else's idea in your own words)
  • summarise (express someone else's idea in a reduced form in your own words
  • quote (express someone else's idea in their exact words) or
  • copy (reproduce a diagram, graph or table from someone else's work).

Harvard UniSA referencing resources and guides

Use the Harvard UniSA referencing system as explained in the UniSA resources. See:

  • Roadmap to Referencing - an online resource that helps you decide what your source is, and how to reference it according to Harvard-UniSA

Your task: make sure that your references are formatted correctly