News Media: Fake news

The Oxford English Dictionary's choice for  2016 word of the year  was “post-truth”, defining it as “relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief.”

The Macquarie Dictionary chose "fake news" as their word for 2016, defining it as “disinformation and hoaxes published on websites for political purposes or to drive web traffic” and “the incorrect information being passed along by social media”. 

What is fake news?

There are four broad categories of fake news, according to media professor Melissa Zimdars of Merrimack College.

CATEGORY 1: Fake, false, or regularly misleading websites that are shared on Facebook and social media. Some of these websites may rely on “outrage” by using distorted headlines and decontextualized or dubious information in order to generate likes, shares, and profits.

CATEGORY 2: Websites that may circulate misleading and/or potentially unreliable information

CATEGORY 3: Websites which sometimes use clickbait-y headlines and social media descriptions

CATEGORY 4: Satire/comedy sites, which can offer important critical commentary on politics and society, but have the potential to be shared as actual/literal news

No single topic falls under a single category - for example, false or misleading medical news may be entirely fabricated (Category 1), may intentionally misinterpret facts or misrepresent data (Category 2), may be accurate or partially accurate but use an alarmist title to get your attention (Category 3) or may be a critique on modern medical practice (Category 4.)  Some articles fall under more than one category.  It is up to you to do the legwork to make sure your information is good.

 

So what? Why should you care about whether or not your news is real or fake?

  1. You deserve the truth.  You are smart enough to make up your own mind - as long as you have the real facts in front of you.  You have every right to be insulted when you read fake news, because you are in essence being treated like an idiot.
  2. Fake news destroys your credibility.  If your arguments are built on bad information, it will be much more difficult for people to believe you in the future.
  3. Fake news can hurt you, and a lot of other people.  Purveyors of fake and misleading medical advice like Mercola.com and NaturalNews.com help perpetuate myths like HIV and AIDS aren't related, or that vaccines cause autism.  These sites are heavily visited and their lies are dangerous.
  4. Real news can benefit you.  If you want to buy stock in a company, you want to read accurate articles about that company so you can invest wisely.  If you are planning on voting in an election, you want to read as much accurate information on a candidate so you can vote for the person who best represents your ideas and beliefs.  Fake news will not help you make money or make the world a better place, but real news can.

Source: http://iue.libguides.com/fakenews

Melissa Zimdars is an Assistant Professor of Communication at Merrimack College in North Andover, Mass. When she saw her students referencing questionable sources, she created and shared a document with them of how to think about sources, as well as a list of misleading, satirical and fake sites.
http://www.merrimack.edu/live/profile
s/586-melissa-mish-zimdars

Fact checking sites and plug-ins

Australian Fact-Checking Sites:

 

Video created by The Conversation

 

International Fact-Checking Sites:

 

  • Climate Change National Forum Fact Checker

 

Identifying Fake News Sites:

 

Browser Plug-ins:

How to spot fake news

How to spot fake news

 

Source: International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA), https://www.ifla.org/publications/node/11174

Factchecker.org

Video created by FactCheck.org

Behind the news

"But first, to our news report about fake news reports. They've been the centre of attention for the past week after some people claimed they might have had a huge effect on the US presidential election. Social media sites like Facebook say they're really hard to stop and despite many sites trying to clamp down on them, there is more around now than ever before."

Behind The News (ABC1); Time: 10:00; Broadcast Date: Tuesday, 29th November 2016; Duration: 4 min., 33 sec.