Entrepreneurship: IP

Types of Intellectual Property

Here are the main forms of Intellectual Property (IP) in Australia:

  Copyright Trademarks Patents Design
Applies to

Literature, film, music, computer programming, visual art

Logos, phrases, unique branding elements
 

Inventions and processes (including pharmaceuticals)

Product design
(visual appearance, not mechanism)

Requires registration? No Yes Yes Yes

The rest of this page provides more information on these forms of IP.

There are also trade secrets, plant breeder's rights, and protection for circuit layouts.

Fore more information about all types of intellectual property, visit IP Australia.

Copyright

Copyright at UniSA

Visit the Copyright Website for information on how copyright is managed at UniSA.

 

Trademarks

Answer:

Company logos such as the KFC and the UniSA logo are examples of Trademarks that are also protected under the Copyright Act as artistic works.

Trademarks are used to distinguish the goods or services of one trader from another, whereas copyright protects the original expression of ideas not the ideas themselves.

Logos, words, letters, numbers, colours, a phrase, sound, scent, shape, picture, aspect of packaging or branding - or any combination of these can receive protection as trademarks under Trademarks law. Content protected by copyright include drawings, art, literature, music, film, broadcasts, computer programs. 

Use of company logos within UniSA teaching materials is permitted provided:

  • Copying is for the non-commercial and educational purposes of the University
  • Copying limits are applied
  • Access is restricted to UniSA Staff and Students
  • A Copyright Notice is displayed

We recommend you add registered™ at the end of the image and indicate the date you accessed the logos on the relevant website (the date is quite important to mention as logos change over time due to rebranding).

 registered™ image

Where trademarks are being used in manuscripts being submitted for publication, permission from the rightsholder (generally the company) will be required. For advice on seeking permission, please complete our online Permission request form

Patents

Here are two case studies on patent application in Australia:

Stormseal: A Success Story

Mango Stick: A Product Without a Market

Business names and website names

Although a business name isn't technically intellectual property, it's still important to make sure names are appropriately registered for your needs, and to protect you from someone else using your name.

typewriter with a paper inserted that says domain search